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Selected Current Grants:

KidsAttuned
Barbara Kalmanson, Ph.D.
1044 Sir Francis Drake Blvd.
Kentfield CA, 94960
Website: www.kidsattuned.org

Title Sentence: Kids Attuned is a virtual community designed to inspire both professionals from a wide range of disciplines, and parents of infants and young children, to learn about the importance of relationships in development.

With the help of the FAR Fund, the web site focuses on teaching the principles and practices of infant and early childhood mental health through online lecture, video, discussion, reflective consultation, and written information accessible globally. The primary principle is that relationships are central to all aspects of growth and development, and to the process of interventions in every discipline. In early childhood, relationship- based interventions are characterized by the central role of parents or primary caregivers in the process. Parent-mediated interventions are intended to promote insightfulness in parents regarding their child rearing practices and about themselves as parents. Treatment planning and implementation is focused on integrated functioning rather than on targeting symptoms. Current research highlights the importance of integration across domains of development including developmental sequences and individual differences. The focus is on function and integration of developmental capacities which support the child’s flexible adaptation to the natural environment.
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Health Research, Inc/New York State Department of Health
Donna M. Noyes, Ph.D.
Associate Director for Clinical Policy
Bureau of Early Intervention
NYS Department of Health
Room 287 Corning Tower Building, ESP
Albany, New York 12237-0660
Phone: 518-473-7016
Email: dmn02@health.state.ny.us and kxf09@health.state.ny.us

Title Sentence: This grant supports a comprehensive updating of the Clinical Practice Guidelines for Autistic Spectrum Disorders (ASD). These guidelines are widely used by pediatricians and other primary care providers throughout New York for the identification, diagnosis, and treatment of ASD.

Project Title: Updating the New York State Clinical Practice Guidelines on Assessment and Intervention for Young Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders
Early identification and treatment can lead to lifelong improvements in health, development, and functioning for children with ASD. The aim of this project is to update the Bureau of Early Intervention’s Clinical Practice Guideline on Assessment and Intervention for Young Children with Autism/Pervasive Developmental Disorders and its companion documents, the Guideline Technical Report and Quick Reference Guide, originally published in 1999. New York’s clinical practice guidelines were the first evidence-based guidelines ever issued on early identification, diagnosis, and treatment of ASDs in young children. These guidelines are widely used by early intervention professionals statewide in the identification, diagnosis, and treatment of ASD, and have been disseminated nationally and internationally. Now more than a decade old, the guidelines will be updated to reflect new and emerging scientific evidence and current clinical consensus on best practices. The FAR Fund grant will provide needed support to collaborate with leading experts in the field of ASD research and treatment at the national and state level on this important effort.
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Health Research, Inc/New York State Department of Health
Donna M. Noyes, Ph.D.
Associate Director for Clinical Policy
Bureau of Early Intervention
NYS Department of Health
Room 287 Corning Tower Building, ESP
Albany, New York 12237-0660
Phone: 518-473-7016
Email: dmn02@health.state.ny.us and kxf09@health.state.ny.us

Title Sentence: This grant will help the Bureau of Early Intervention expand its efforts to train pediatricians on early identification and treatment of Autistic Spectrum Disorders (ASD) and to provide online support to pediatric practices throughout New York State.

Project Title: Physician Training and Web Portal Support to Promote ASD Screening in Medical Homes
This FAR Fund grant will be used to expand the Bureau of Early Intervention’s efforts, made possible by grant number H6MMC15104 from the Health and Human Resources Administration, Maternal and Child Health Bureau Combating Autism Act Initiative, to train physicians about developmental screening and to provide online support to incorporate universal screening into their pediatric practices. Known as the “Partners for Healthy Futures for Children and Youth with ASDs, this grant-funded training curriculum is designed to educate physicians on early identification and treatment of ASDs. Physicians and nurse practitioners who attend receive free continuing medical education credits and training in implementing universal screening, the importance of early identification, making an accurate diagnosis, making referrals for early intensive interventions, ongoing medical management, complementary and alternative medicine sought by families, and effective communication with parents. In addition, physicians are introduced to the Autism Resources for Physicians web portal, designed to serve as a clearinghouse of autism information for physicians who have reported challenges in finding quality resources and information on the Internet. The portal features links to the NYSDOH Bureau of Early Intervention, American Academy of Pediatrics, and federal and community resources. A calendar of events announces trainings and meetings. The centerpiece of the website is the “Physician’s Forum” where physicians, Bureau of Early Intervention staff, and ASD experts can discuss, comment on, and ask questions about screening, assessment, diagnosis, and treatment best practices, as well as available resources. With support from the FAR Fund, BEI will collaborate with colleagues from Hunter College and Cornell Medical Center to schedule and conduct two group training sessions in the New York City metropolitan area, with the goal of training 80 physicians. In addition, the faculty support for the Autism web portal for physicians will be enhanced.
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City University of New York
Christopher Rosa, Ph.D., University Assistant Dean
Central Office Division of Student Affairs
101 West 31 Street
New York, NY 10001
Phone: 646-344-7251
Email: Christopher.rosa@mail.cuny.edu
Website: http://www.cuny.edu/about/administration/offices/sa.html

Title Sentence: This autism initiative at City University of New York allows for the development and implementation of a replicable model across all 24 campuses to strengthen and expand the increase the supports to students with autism spectrum disorders.

Project Title: REACH: Resources and Education on Autism as CUNY’s Hallmark
REACH is a project developed at City University of New York (CUNY) to build capacity to better serve the growing population of college students with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Since CUNY students operate within a complex web of people and structures, the program aims to educate faculty and staff about students with ASD. Students with ASD are among the fastest growing populations of college students. CUNY expects its population of students with ASD to grow exponentially over the next few years. CUNY’s mission is to provide affordable and accessible higher education opportunities to ALL New Yorkers, especially those who have historically not had access to higher education opportunities, like students on the autism spectrum. Inclusive higher education is the next great civil rights movement and CUNY wants to lead this movement by cultivating a University environment that promotes the success and full participation of students with ASD. This investment by the FAR Fund empowers CUNY to develop and implement a replicable programming model on its campuses to increase the quality and quantity of supports to students with ASD at CUNY in order to improve the quality of their college experience, their persistence, and their degree attainment. At the same time, it will affect the University’s culture through education on the higher educational needs of this rapidly increasing student population. As part of the planning process, we will formulate specific strategies about what services/activities to provide; to whom they should be provided; who should provide the services, when they should be provided. Planning grant activities include creating an Advisory Board and gathering information about supports/activities for CUNY students with ASD; identifying Implementation panel to guide project staff on implementation, questions and issues; selecting specific CUNY schools to develop and model best practices; identifying activities for the training of staff of offices for students with disabilities on ASD; and identifying methods to involve CUNY faculty in training activities.
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Hunter College/City University of New York
Michael Siller, PhD
Assistant Professor of Psychology
Co-Director Hunter College Autism Center
695 Park Avenue, Room 611
New York, NY 10065
Phone: 212-772-4477
Email: msiller@hunter.cuny.edu
Website: www.hunter.cuny.edu/autismsymposium

Title Sentence: This grant from The FAR Fund provided support for a public policy roundtable that aimed to identify obstacles that delay children's prompt access to early intervention services in New York City. These recommendations informed the second part of this grant, which focuses on how best to educate pediatricians on best practice for screening and referral of toddlers with Autism Spectrum Disorders.

Project Title: Advancing Early Intervention Services for Toddlers with Autism Roosevelt House Policy Round Table on Early Intervention for Toddlers with ASD
During the last decade, research on Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) has made tremendous progress with regards to early identification. For the first time, it is feasible to reliably identify red flags for autism in children as young as 18 months. Despite these advances, most children with ASD continue to be identified at significantly older ages, often beyond 3 years of age. This roundtable was held at the Roosevelt House Public Policy Institute at Hunter College in March 2011. This program was fully funded by The FAR Fund. Videos of the panel presentations can be viewed at www.hunter.cuny.edu/autismroundtable.

The recommendations developed during the roundtable were used to shape the second part of this project. First, we are currently testing the feasibility of three complementary models for educating Primary Care Providers (e.g., pediatricians) on best practice for screening and referral of toddlers with ASD. These training models include conventional continuing education courses, office based trainings, and learning collaboratives. Second, we are offering support to families who receive a referral for further evaluations from their pediatrician. Specifically, families are invited to participate in a series of prompt, independent assessments, which provide parents with feedback on their child's behavior across a variety of activities and contexts.
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Yale University Child Study Center, School of Nursing, Fair Haven Community Health Center (FHCHC), & Cornell Scott Hill Health Center (CSHHC)
Crista Marchesseault, MAT, MA
Project Director
Yale Child Study Center
230 Frontage Road
PO Box 207900
New Haven, CT 06520-7900
Phone: 203-737-1509
Email: crista.marchesseault@yale.edu
Website: http://www.childstudycenter.yale.edu/services/baby.aspx

Title Sentence: Minding the Baby is an intensive home visiting multidisciplinary program working with first-time young mothers and their families in New Haven, Connecticut that emphasizes attachment theory and reflective parenting methodologies.

Project Title: Minding the Baby
A collaborative project among four institutions, Minding the Baby (MTB) is one of the first Reflective Parenting programs in the USA. The program pairs a pediatric nurse practitioner and a licensed clinical social worker with at-risk, medically underserved young families who attend the FHCHC and CSHHC. Minding the Baby clinicians provide in-home interventions from pregnancy through the child’s second birthday. The focus of each nurse/mental health team is to enhance attachment relationships by developing reflective parenting capacities, supporting positive parenting behaviors, and promote positive health, mental health, life course, and attachment outcomes in babies, mothers, and their families. The weekly combination of social service and mental health service in the mothers’ homes has had significant positive impact on the health and quality of life of the first 60 families enrolled in the program since 2002. Clinicians receive intensive training in the intervention model and ongoing joint supervision. MTB provides direct clinical services while integrating a randomized clinical trial study. Funding from The FAR Fund supports the ongoing development and administration of these services for underserved young families.
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Adelphi University
Institute for Parenting
Marcy Safyer, LCSW-R
1 South Avenue
PO Box 701
Garden City, New York 11530
Phone: 516-877-3060
Email: msafyer@adelphi.edu
Website: www.adelphi.edu

Title Sentence: This grant provides funding for infant mental health services utilizing the Child-Parent Psychotherapy model, provides high quality supervision for the clinical staff, and provides training to doctoral and MSW students.

Project Title: Reflective Supervision and General Operating Expenses
The Institute for Parenting has developed a range of Infant Mental Health services that include as the main therapeutic approach; Child-Parent Psychotherapy (CPP) with video guidance and video feedback sessions, along with emotional support; developmental and parent guidance; early relationship assessment; advocacy; concrete assistance and aid in building support systems for a range of parent(s) and their infants/toddlers such as foster parents with infants/ toddlers in their care who have experienced extreme physical abuse, mothers with postpartum depression and their newborns and parents with children adopted from orphanages in Russia experiencing problems with affect regulation. In addition, the Institute launched the VISIT Project- Visitation for Infants/toddlers that is Supervised Intensive and Therapeutic as a collaboration with the Nassau County Family Court and the Department of Social Services specifically focused on serving 0-4 year olds who are in foster care and their biological parents. The goal of these services is to address early relational impairments and developmental challenges to strengthen parent-child relationships and prevent long term psychological and developmental complications. Families in the foster care system have an additional goal of expedited successful and lasting permanency. The Grant from the FAR Fund will enable the Institute for Parenting to make quality dyadic treatment more effective, available and accessible to increasing numbers of parent(s) and their very young children. In addition, the grant will support supervision and training for the clinical staff that will deepen and enhance the quality of their work and benefit the families receiving child-parent psychotherapy.
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Association to Benefit Children (ABC)
Judy Holtzman, Director of Special Projects
419 E 86th Street
New York, NY 10028
Phone: 212-845-3823
Email: JudyHoltzman@a-b-c.org
Website: www.a-b-c.org

Title Sentence: Association to Benefit Children’s Fast Break, New York City’s first mobile mental health crisis and disaster clinic, is designed to extend mental health services to children living in poverty and eliminate the need for costly and restrictive hospitalizations and institutionalizations.

Project Title: Fast Break
Based at ABC’s Echo Park, but nimble enough to go wherever a child in emotional crisis is, Fast Break provides psychiatric treatment as well as educational evaluation and advocacy for children and families in distress. Skilled therapists stabilize crises and go on to engage in short- or longer-term therapy when needed. Mental health services are extended to very young children and their parents through screenings of 2,000 children a year in Head Start and day care centers throughout Manhattan. ABC’s FLOW, Families Lead Our Way, an initiative made possible with funding from The FAR Fund has been fully integrated into Fast Break and is a support service for parents of children with special challenges, including autism. FLOW assists families with the complex process of accessing appropriate services for their children, and encouraging knowledge and self-advocacy.
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Autism Science Foundation
Alison Singer, President
419 Lafayette Street, 2nd floor
New York, NY 10003
Phone: 914-552-1580
Email: asinger@autismsciencefoundation.org
Website: autismsciencefoundation.org

Title Sentence: Autism Science Foundation provides funding for both pre-doctoral and post-doctoral fellowships to help train committed young scientists in an environment conducive to beginning a career in autism research. The FAR Fund is supporting one fellowship for the 2012-2013 year.

Project Title: Fellowship Program
The Autism Science Foundation (ASF) provides funding directly to scientists who are conducting cutting-edge research to discover the causes of autism and to develop better treatments for individuals with autism. ASF also provides information about autism to the general public and serves to increase awareness of autism spectrum disorders and the needs of individuals and families affected by autism.
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Behind the Book
Jo Umans, Executive Director
356 West 123rd Street
New York, NY 10027
Phone: 212-222-3627
Email: jo.umans@gmail.com
Website: www.behindthebook.org

Title Sentence: This grant provides general support to Behind the Book to promote literacy and a reading culture among low-income students in the New York City public schools by bringing published authors and illustrators into classrooms.

Project Title: Creating Readers for Life
Behind the Book's (BTB) mission is to motivate young people to become engaged readers by connecting them to contemporary writers and illustrators. BTB brings authors and their books into individual classrooms to build literacy skills, and create a community of life-long readers and writers. Programs take place in NYC’s underserved public schools, are part of the class curricula. BTB believes that every student deserves the freedom that comes from the ability to read and think independently. Programs include book and art supply donations to students, classrooms and school libraries, field trips that bring books to life and professional development for teachers.
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Birch Family Services, Inc.
Gerald F. Maurer, Ph.D. CEO
104 W. 29th St. 3rd Fl
New York, NY 10001
Phone: 212-616-1810
Email: gerry.maurer@birchfamilyservices.org
Website: www.birchfamilyservices.org

Title Sentence: The Supported Internship Program is a highly individualized and intensive employment preparation program designed to place college graduates with Asperger Syndrome (AS) in jobs that best utilize their passions, interests and talents to the mutual advantage of the individuals with AS and their employers.

Project Title: A Supported Internship Program for Graduates with Asperger Syndrome
In collaboration with the National Autistic Society of the UK (NAS) and the Asperger Syndrome Training & Employment Partnership (ASTEP), Birch Family Services (Birch) will replicate NAS’s highly successful and award winning Prospects program in the United States. In the UK, the Prospects Supported Internship Program, a collaboration between NAS’s employment service and Goldman Sachs London (GSL), has placed more than 50 college graduates with Asperger Syndrome (AS) into paid, supported internships in a diverse array of jobs within GSL’s Technology, Legal, Treasury, Operations, Corporate Services, and Middle Office teams. This program has led to post-internship employment for more than 95% of the interns. The Prospects model includes a flexible package of pre-internship training to build the individual’s skills and confidence to prepare for internship/employment, comprising one-to-one sessions and small-group workshops focusing on a range of areas such as: awareness of one’s AS-related characteristics and their potential effects in the workplace; communication skills for the workplace; job searching and interview skills; and occupational choice. Pre-internship training is provided for the human resources staff, work unit manager, and colleagues. During the actual internship, ongoing workplace support is provided for the intern, manager, colleagues, and human resources staff. In the replication of the Prospects model in the US, Birch and ASTEP will bring their complementary areas of expertise to partnerships with US companies to provide internship and employment opportunities to graduates with AS. FAR Fund’s grant is helping to fund the training of the Birch’s staff in the NAS Prospects model and is assisting with the first year’s implementation costs.
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Chances for Children
Hillary A Mayers, LCSW, co-director
Elizabeth Buckner, LCSW, co-director
21 West 86th Street, Suite 401
New York, NY 10024
Phone: 917-441-0119 or 212-799-3536
Website: chancesforchildren-ny.org

Title Sentence: Chances for Children Highbridge Program provides dyadic intervention for parents and children ages 0-5 in the Highbridge section of the Bronx, a neighborhood with the highest percentage of removals to foster-care in NYC, a neighborhood with no other treatment options for children 5 years and under.

Project Title: Chances for Children Highbridge Program Part-time Clinical Position
This Chances for Children (CFC) program provides both preventive and post-placement interventions for parents and children 0-5 as well as assessment of infant/toddler development. The program allows us to detect, prevent and intervene with psychological problems early in the life of the child and family before abuse occurs. CFC offers an evidence-based, best-practices model of video-recorded mother-infant interaction that is used to: strengthen and solidify bonds of attachment between mother and infant; improve parenting skills, including the ability to anticipate and appropriately respond to developmental changes in the infant over time; increase positive verbal and non-verbal interactions between mother and child; and assess and provide treatment for mental conditions such as depression, anxiety or post-traumatic stress in both parent and child.
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City Access New York (CANY) and Museum Access Consortium (MAC)
Ken Struve, Executive Director
1207 Castleton Avenue
Staten Island, NY 10310
Phone: 718-285-6548
Email: Twoc5@earthlink.net
Website: www.cityaccessny.org

Title Sentence: Museum Access Consortium is designed to increase awareness, commitment and accessible program offerings for people with autism at cultural institutions in New York City.

Project Title: Access at NYC Cultural Institutions for People with Autistic Spectrum Disorders
Museum Access Consortium (MAC) assists cultural facilities of all types to increase access for people with disabilities and includes 60 cultural institutions, as well as representatives of the disability community. This grant provides training workshops for museum professionals, educators and not for profit service providers on how to adapt programming to meet the needs of visitors with autism. It will pilot accessibility projects at the New York Transit Museum and the Museum at Eldridge Street. A major goal is to develop and provide a model for museums as they develop programming for individuals with autism and their families.
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City University of New York (CUNY) Doctoral Program in Clinical Psychology
Elliot L. Jurist, Ph.D., Subprogram Head
Arietta Slade, Ph.D., Professor
North Academic Center
New York, NY 10031
Phone: 212-650-5676
Email: EJurist@gc.cuny.edu and ASlade@gc.cuny.edu
Website: http://web.gc.cuny.edu/Psychology/clinical/overview/index.html

Title Sentence: This grant helps the CUNY doctoral program in clinical psychology to continue to train students in contemporary psychodynamic perspectives, providing funding for student clinical work, community projects, and lectures from diverse experts.

Project Title: CUNY Doctoral Program in Clinical Psychology
The doctoral program in clinical psychology at City College is a sought-after and highly prestigious program that emphasizes understanding human behavior as a complex and multi-determined set of phenomena that simultaneously influences a range of intrapsychic, developmental, system, behavioral, biological, and cultural variables. The FAR Fund provides ongoing support for the CUNY program with its particular emphasis on psychodynamic perspectives, and provides for clinical fellowships, follow-up student research, a distinguished lecture series, adjunct faculty, dissertation fellowships, and community outreach fellowships. This grant includes matched funding and a five-year commitment from the Chancellor’s office.
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Early Childhood Center
Marian Silverman, Psy.D.
Rose F. Kennedy University Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities
Albert Einstein College of Medicine
1731 Seminole Avenue
Bronx, NY 10461
Phone: 718-430-8900
Email: marian.silverman@einstein.yu.edu
Website: http://www.einstein.yu.edu

Title Sentence: One of the goals of the Therapeutic Visiting Program is early intervention to advocate for children in foster care and promote and support the process of reunification, and/or expedited permanency planning.

Project Title: Therapeutic Visiting Program
The Early Childhood Center’s Therapeutic Visiting Program works with children and families that are in the foster care system and was developed in collaboration with the NYC Administration for Children’s Services and other agencies. The underlying assumption guiding this project is that by providing a structured and supportive parent-child intervention during a family’s visit parents can gain positive parenting skills and address some of the factors that likely led to the child’s removal from the home. Each family enrolled in the program is assigned a “visit coach” who then joins the family visits regularly. This project provides a valuable service to families so that the chances for reunification are increased. When reunification does not seem feasible, then the focus of intervention is to expedite permanency planning. The Early Childhood Center’s approaches include Parent-Child Psychotherapy, Interaction Guidance, Home Visit Coaching, and the Nurturing Parenting Program. It is expected that the comprehensive services provided by the Therapeutic Visiting Program will result in a decline, at each age group, of foster care reentry.
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Early Childhood Direction Center
New York Presbyterian Hospital
Marilyn Rubinstein
435 East 70th, Suite 2A
New York, NY 10021
Phone: 212-746-6175
Email: mrubinst@nyp.org

Title Sentence: The Early Childhood Direction Center (ECDC) at New York Presbyterian Hospital provides free neutral information and referral assistance to families and professionals about supports and services for young children with known or suspected developmental delays and/or disabilities.

Project Title: Early Childhood Direction Center
The Early Childhood Direction Center (ECDC) at New York Presbyterian Hospital is one of fourteen ECDCs in New York State funded through a contract with the State Education Department. Each year, the ECDC staff provides direct one-to-to one telephone assistance to over one thousand Manhattan families and maintains regular follow-up contact with parents and caregivers until their child enters kindergarten. Many of the families who are referred to the ECDC live in challenging situations, where having a child with a disability is only one of many stresses they face. In addition to helping families negotiate and navigate the complex early intervention and preschool special education systems, ECDC staff conducts workshops for families and educators on topics related to child development, inclusion and transition. By providing families with information and guidance, we help them to become better educated consumers and more effective advocates for their children -- a valuable skill in a city as complex as New York. Funding from The FAR Fund supports the development of a website, database and outreach materials. The website will provide information about child development, early intervention, preschool special education, disability related and early childhood services and supports, as well as local resources, best practices and government entitlements. Print outreach materials will be utilized at trainings and community networking events. The data collection system will allow us to track and maintain our contacts with families and professionals, monitor service provision and help us link families to other families with similar needs.
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Educational Alliance /14th Street Y
Parenting, Family, and Early Childhood Center
Ms. Dana Federbush
Associate Director
344 East 14th Street
New York, NY 10003
Phone: 212-780-0800
Email: Dana_Federbush@14streety.org
Website: www.14streetY.org

Title Sentence: This Special Needs Program at the 14th Street Y provides weekend recreational programs to children with special needs.

Project Title: Special Needs Program at the 14th Street Y
The 14th Street Y, a Jewish Community Center of The Educational Alliance, is located in lower Manhattan. This grant provides funding to develop a high quality recreational and supportive services program serving children ages 4 to 11 years old with special needs and their families. The program also provides opportunities for socialization. Recreational activities include: capoeira, soccer, art, and music. The grant will also provide training for 14th Street Y Program Early Childhood staff to help them learn to identify and work with children who have special needs.
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Hunter College, City University of New York
Department of Curriculum and Teaching
Penny Shaw, MA
Project Director
695 Park Avenue, 1023W
New York, NY 10065
Phone 212-772-4613
Email: pshaw@hunter.cuny.edu
Website: project-happy.org

Title Sentence: Project HAPPY provides free recreation and socialization opportunities for children with Autistic Spectrum Disorders.

Project Title: Project HAPPY (Hunter Athletic Program for Parents and Youth)
Project HAPPY provides needed recreation and socialization opportunities for people with disabilities aged 6 through 30 years of age living in New York City. The program is located at the Brookdale Campus of Hunter College (425 East 25th Street). The program, which started in 1981, focuses on developing athletic skills using adapted methods, a low teacher-student ratio, a high degree of peer interaction, and a supportive and enriching environment. All services are free. This grant will help the program develop additional programming (swimming and soccer) for children with Autistic Spectrum Disorders.
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Hunter College, City University of New York
Department of Special Education
Jamie D. Bleiweiss, Ph.D., Assistant Professor
695 Park Avenue, 9th Floor West
New York, NY 10065
Phone: 845-548-1560
Email: JBleiwei@Hunter.cuny.edu
Website: http://www.hunter.cuny.edu/school-of-education/departments/special-education

Title Sentence: This project will produce a series of podcasts on Positive Behavior Supports for parents of children with autism spectrum disorders to be used at New York City public schools with ASD Nest programs and posted on the websites of multiple autism centers.

Project Title: Podcasts on Positive Behavior Supports for Parents of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders
Parents of children with autism spectrum disorders want to know how to interact with their children in positive ways that support their development and enhance their functioning as members of the family and community. The ASD Nest program, which receives university support from Hunter College, CUNY as well as NYU, is currently based in 23 New York City public schools, serving almost 500 children on the autism spectrum. That program has attempted to provide workshops on positive behavior supports for the families of these students. However, it has become an increasingly challenging task to do so, as the program has continued to grow, and many parents cannot participate in workshops when they require travel to other school sites. The podcast series, which will present information and strategies in small segments, will be used by social workers at ASD Nest programs to lead the workshops at their school sites. Training will be provided to the social workers on the use of the podcasts, which will be pilot tested at parent meetings in two elementary schools. In addition, the podcasts will be made available on the websites of autism centers.
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Institute for Basic Research in Developmental Disabilities
Steve Holburn, PhD and Christine Cea, PhD
Laboratory of Intervention Research
1050 Forest Hill Road
Staten Island, NY 10314
Phone: 718-494-0600
Email: Steve.Holburn@opwdd.ny.gov or Christine.Cea@opwdd.ny.gov
Website: http://www.opwdd.ny.gov/ws/ws_ibr_resources.jsp

Title Sentence: The goal of this pilot project is to improve the health knowledge and practices of adolescents at the Hungerford Middle/High School, a public special education school on Staten Island.

Project Title: Promoting Healthy Lifestyles for Adolescents with Developmental Disabilities
This grant utilizes a collaborative approach that includes classroom teachers and paraprofessionals as well as families. Special education teachers use the Health Advocacy Program (HAP, Holburn, Cea, & Gordon, 2008) in the classroom. Paraprofessionals use the Supporting Healthy Lifestyles Guide for Support Professionals (The Guide, Cea & Holburn, 2010) in supporting students’ follow-up to the HAP instruction. In addition, as part of this project, a student workbook is being developed that will individualize health advocacy, health goals, and general health behavior. The ultimate goal is to teach individuals how to be their own health advocates and adhere to healthy lifestyle practices as they enter adulthood.
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Job Path
Fredda Rosen, Executive Director
22 West 38th Street, 11th floor
New York, NY 10018
Phone: 212-944-0564
Email: frozen@jobpathnyc.org
Website: JobPathnyc.org

Title Sentence: This grant supports Job Path to design and pilot supports that will enable men and women with autism spectrum disorders to live in their own homes.

Project Title: A Model for Independent Living for Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorders
This project will help four men in their twenties and thirties move from their family homes and pilot a “shared living” model where roommates without disabilities provide the assistance that they need to live in their own apartments. The goal will be to enable the men to live stable and vibrant home lives and become active contributors to their community by engaging in volunteer, civic and social activities in accordance with their interests. This project aims to create a design that can be adapted by other organizations and expanded into a full-scale program.
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John Jay College of Criminal Justice
William H. Gottdiener, PhD
Director, Addiction Studies Program
Department of Psychology
445 West 59th Street
New York, NY 10019
Phone: 646-557-4685
Email: wgottdiener@jjay.cuny.edu
Website: www.jjay.cuny.edu/academics/734.php

Title Sentence: This study will determine the relationship between personality dynamics and alcohol use problems in college students.

Project Title: The Relationship Between Personality And Alcohol Use In College Students
Alcohol abuse is widespread among college students. This study aims to determine the personality dynamics that predict alcohol abuse in college students. More specifically we will determine if the quality of a person’s defense mechanisms predicts a college student’s degree of alcohol abuse. The study also aims to determine which variables might moderate the relationship between defense mechanisms and alcohol abuse such as, whether a person has a co-occurring psychological disorder like posttraumatic stress disorder. We plan to use the results gleaned from this study to develop a treatment study for college students who have co-occurring posttraumatic stress disorder and alcohol use disorder. At the end of this project, the proposed treatment study will be considered for funding.
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Kaplen Jewish Community Center on the Palisades
Lois Mendelson, Ph.D., Director
411 E Clinton Ave.
Tenafly, NJ 07670
Phone: 201-569-7900
Email: gweiss@jccotp.org
Website: www.jccotp.org

Title Sentence: The Therapeutic Nursery is a program for intelligent preschool children (ages 2-6) with a variety of developmental disabilities, including Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD), learning disabilities, communication disorders and emotional problems.

Project Title: Therapeutic Nursery Program
Established in 1978, the Therapeutic Nursery is now located at the Kaplen Jewish Community Center on the Palisades in Tenafly, New Jersey. The program is based on a collaborative process that includes parents, who attend school with their children on a daily basis. The Therapeutic Nursery’s educational approach addresses behavioral, language and cognitive development, and also focuses on play and socialization, verbal and non-verbal communication, and emotional and behavioral regulation. The FAR Fund grant supports the development of a Manual of the Parent Component of the Treatment Model, as well as a Scholarship Fund.
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New Alternatives for Children
Arlene Goldsmith, LCSW, PhD
Executive Director
37 West 26th Street, 6th floor
New York, NY 10010
Phone: 212-696-1550
Email: agoldsmith@nackidscan.org
Website: NacKidsCan.org

Title Sentence: The goal of this project is to provide the intensive therapeutic support and tools needed for parents with cognitive/psychological disorders to appropriately bond and care for their children at home via a three-pronged approach of intensive mental health treatment, parent-child interaction, support and education.

Project Title: Building Blocks: Nurturing Parent-Child Bonding
New Alternatives for Children (NAC) was established in 1982 to work with medically fragile babies and children languishing in hospitals. Today, NAC serves low-income families as well as foster and adoptive families caring for at least one medically complex child at home. The focus of the Building Blocks intervention model is to provide early and vital mental health assessment, treatment, and support that promotes greater parent-child bonding and attachment among parents who are caring for a child(ren) with complex medical and emotional needs and who themselves have a cognitive impairment, psychological dysfunction, ad/or other risk factors. Building Blocks with provide the intensive therapeutic support and tools needed for parents to appropriately bond and care for their children at home, avoiding the risk of child abandonment, abuse or neglect, foster care placement, and long-term foster care involvement.
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New York University (NYU)
Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development
Dorothy Siegel, MPA, Senior Project Director
Email: dorothy.siegel@nyu.edu
Website: http://steinhardt.nyu.edu/asdnest/

Title Sentence: The goal of the ASD Nest Support Project is to advance the development and implementation of educational solutions for children living with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD).

Project Title: Workshop Services for Parents of Students in the ASD Nest Support Program
NYU's partnership with New York City’s Department of Education (DoE) and Hunter College’s School of Education began in 2001 to fill a gap in the programs the DoE offered for higher functioning children on the autism spectrum. The fruit of that collaboration was the new ASD Nest program, piloted at PS 32 in Brooklyn in September 2003. Its goal is to help these children learn how to function well academically, behaviorally and socially in school and in their community. The Nest program has grown and spread across New York City. In the 2011-12 school year, the New York City school system educates 500 children with ASDs in 131 fully inclusive Nest classrooms in 19 elementary schools, three middle schools and one high school.

With support from the FAR Fund, the ASD Nest Support Project provides on-site workshops on a variety of relevant topics for parents of children in the ASD Nest program. The 2011-12 workshop topics are Positive Behavior Supports and Social Development Intervention, designed to give parents the tools they need to help their child at home. The FAR Fund grant also supports development of a series of short explanatory videos for the ASD Nest Support Project website.
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New Orleans-Birmingham Psychoanalytic Center (NOBPC)
Kathryn Nathan, Ph.D.
Clinical Grant Coordinator, The FAR Fund-NOLA Project
3624 Coliseum Street
New Orleans, LA
Phone: 505-899-5815
Email: kathrynnathan3@gmail.com
Website: www.TherapistsPostDisaster.com

Title Sentence: This project is a New Orleans-based program for mental health professionals. Designed to offer concrete help and support to local therapists in the wake of Hurricane Katrina, its implications extend beyond the city of New Orleans to other disaster-affected communities.

Project Title: The FAR Fund Project: Supporting Psychotherapists after Katrina
The FAR Fund Project is sponsored by the New Orleans-Birmingham Psychoanalytic Center, which helped to create a New Orleans-based program designed by and for mental health providers following Hurricane Katrina. Its main focus is the affected clinician. The complex aftermath of Hurricane Katrina created a difficult task for New Orleans therapists, i.e., to address a mental health crisis while simultaneously living it. This project offers help to local mental health clinicians of all disciplines and diverse theoretical orientations. The grant will also aid in the development of a psychodynamic model to better understand how shared trauma affects therapists and therapy. Ghislaine Boulanger, Ph.D., is a leading researcher in the long-term consequences of adult onset psychological trauma, is the project’s long-standing program consultant. In addition, this project produced a DVD entitled Shared Trauma: Psychotherapy in New Orleans After Hurricane Katrina, as well as a website Post-Disaster Therapists’ Resource: Lessons learned by psychotherapists in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina.
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One on One Foundation
Amy Margolis, PhD
Executive Director
142 Joralemon Street Suite 3E
Brooklyn, NY 11201
Phone: 718-935-0400
Email: amy@oneononefuoundation.org
Website: oneononefoundation.org

Title Sentence: The One on One Foundation supports underserved New York City schoolchildren and families by helping struggling students gain access to the highest quality, state of the art educational treatment they need.

Project Title: Homework Therapy for Students with Spectrum Disorders and Reading Disorders
A core belief is that individual, one-on-one intervention can address a wide range of educational problems including children’s reading and writing disorders and related difficulties such as organization and planning. Homework Therapy is a unique treatment that combines tutoring, remediation, and psychotherapy to reduce student’s academic and emotional stress and promote educational success. Students are provided neuropsychological testing, tutoring and psychotherapy free of charge. In addition, the Homework Therapy program works with the families and teaches parents to support their children at home.
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Purchase College - State University of New York
Lauren Greiner, Ph.D.
Director of Autism Spectrum Disorders Program
Purchase, NY 10577
Phone: 914-251-6390
Email: Lauren.Greiner@Purchase.edu
Website: www.purchase.edu

Title Sentence: This grant allows for Purchase College to expand their Supported Education program and specifically meet the needs of students with Asperger’s Syndrome Disorder (ASD).

Project Title: Asperger’s Syndrome; College and Beyond
Purchase College has hosted a Supported Education program in collaboration with the Office of Mental Health and the Guidance Center of New Rochelle for the past nineteen years. The program helps students with psychiatric and developmental disabilities navigate college. The number of students arriving on campus with Asperger’s Syndrome Disorder was previously too great for the program to accommodate. The grant from The FAR Fund allows for Purchase College to expand their program and specifically meet the needs of students with Asperger’s Syndrome. College and Beyond hosts a weekly support group, recruits student mentors who provide ongoing services, and gives students the opportunity to meet weekly with a vocational counselor from the Jewish Child Care Association Compass Project. Additionally, College and Beyond strives to develop meaningful internship opportunities for students in the program. Collaborating with the college’s offices of Counseling and Career Development, and with faculty and staff, this program allows students with Asperger’s Syndrome to be successful in college and prepared to enter the job market holding professional positions.
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Resources for Children with Special Needs, Inc.
Rachel Howard, Executive Director
116 East 16th Street, 5th floor
New York, NY 10003
Phone: 212-677-4650
Email: RHoward@resourcesnyc.org
Website: www.resourcesnyc.org

Title Sentence: This grant allows Resources for Children with Special Needs to pilot a new program to provide parent training and information to support NYC families of children with autism spectrum disorders and other special needs during the developmental disabilities systems reform.

Project Title: Information and Training to Help Parents Understand, Access, and Advocate in an Era of Systems Reform.
Resources for Children with Special Needs (RCSN) mission is to enhance quality of life and promote bright futures for children and youth, birth through age 26, with disabilities and their families throughout New York City (NYC). RCSN’s work promotes parent engagement, which is proven to significantly improve educational and other key outcomes for children with special needs. To respond to the different needs of these families, RCSN will develop four new community educational programs focused on parents of (a) very young children (ages 5 and under), (b) school-aged children (ages 6 – 13); transition-aged youth (14 – 21), and (d) young adults (ages 22 through 26). These programs will create a safe, responsive and respectful venue for parents of children at different developmental phases and ages to understand the ongoing changes in special education, OPWDD services and other systems; to develop a vision for their specific child’s future; and to learn concrete strategies to realize their goals.
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SNACK & Friends, Inc (Special Needs Activity Center for Kids)
Jackie Ceonzo, Executive Director and Founder
220 East 86th St,
New York, NY 10028
Phone: 212-439 -9996
Email: jackie@snacknyc.com
Website: www.snacknyc.com

Title Sentence: Friday Night @SNACK for Teens will fill a huge void in the lives of teenagers with developmental disabilities by giving them an opportunity to interact with their peers while learning to engage in new activities like air hockey, Wii games, and team sports.

Project Title: Friday Night @ SNACK for Teens
In order to grow with the children it serves, SNACK & Friends, Inc seeks to create an innovative teen socialization and recreational program. SNACK was founded by a family of a boy on the spectrum, who has now entered his teen years. At SNACK we strongly believe that people with disabilities deserve to have the same opportunities available to neuro-typical people and realize the environment needs to be adapted and staffed to achieve success. The program will be structured to meet the teens often challenging and physical behavior providing intensive support by trained staff. It will also offer a period of respite for families who will be confident that their teens are in a safe, loving and productive environment. For typically developing children, the teen years are usually a time of tremendous growth filled with new social opportunities, greater independence and integration into larger society. For children with developmental disabilities like autism, entering adolescence often has the reverse effect. Rather than their world expanding, their bigger physical size and the frequent increase in their challenging behaviors, often lead to a more restrictive existence than when they were younger children. It is hard to find a place where they can be themselves and be included. Teenagers with special needs need a welcoming environment where they can experience fun and friends, learn independence and be safe. Friday Night@SNACK for Teens program will provide these opportunities and more. Thanks to an award from the FAR Fund this teen program will launch in February 2012.
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The Fostering Connection
Paula Gilovich, Administrative Coordinator
511 Avenue of the Americas, #200
New York, NY 10011
Phone: 212-255-8895
Email: thefosteringconnection@gmail.com
Website: thefosteringconnectionnyc.org

Title Sentence: The Fostering Connection is a group of socially minded psychotherapists whose mission and programs have been developed around an appreciation of the need for continuity in the lives of foster children. Therapists provide pro-bono psychotherapy and process groups to families, individuals affected by foster care, and community agencies.

Project Title: Pro-bono Psychotherapy Initiative & Consultation Initiative
The pro-bono Psychotherapy Initiative partners with organizations that serve foster children, youth and families. Through these partnerships, as well as the provision of individual psychotherapists who are devoted to finding therapeutic modes of connections, The Fostering Connection (TFC) endeavors to foster experiences of continuity and connection. To support these therapists TFC provides group process and a therapeutic community essential to these efforts. The Consultation Initiative provides experienced therapists who lead process groups in agencies that serve foster children, and offers professional ways to think about, reflect upon and process the experience of their work.
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Youth Consultation Service
Institute for Infant and Preschool Mental Health
Diane Squadron, Psy.D.
Director, YCS Institute
60 Evergreen Place
East Orange, NJ 07018
Phone: 973-395-5500 ext. 309
Email: dsquadron@ycs.org
Website: http://www.ycs.org/index.php/mnuservices/mnuinfantinstitute

Title Sentence: This parent-infant program is designed to assist urban families in fostering nurturing and healthy relationships between infants and their parents or caregivers consequently reducing problems associated with poor attachment such as developmental delays, and underdeveloped cognitive and emotional skills.

Project Title: Parent-Infant Services Coordinator
Since 1918, Youth Consultation Service (YCS) has provided behavioral and mental health services to New Jersey’s at-risk and special needs children. The primary focus of the YCS Institute for Infant and Preschool Mental Health is the nature of the relationships between infants and their families, addressing the health and wellness of the mother, child and the overall family unit. The Parent-Infant Services Coordinator will oversee a range of programming where parents and caregivers can strengthen these skills and learn to interact and connect with their babies in a relaxed and supportive setting. The Parent-Infant Services Coordinator is responsible for parent-infant group therapies and programs, outreach efforts to community organizations, psychotherapeutic and assessment services to infants, preschool children and their families, and supervisory activities of staff and trainees.
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